Telemedicine Movement Moving Forward in Indiana


Virtual doctor measures blood pressure

Our friends at Gibson Insurance posted a blog today about the advancement of telemedicine in Indiana. They also included comments from Indiana Chamber VP Mike Ripley:

Prior to March 21, 2016, Indiana was one of just a handful of states that had not legislatively addressed the subject of telemedicine. Meanwhile Illinois and Ohio currently have proposed telemedicine parity bills but nothing set in stone – and Wisconsin has no parity legislative activity at this time. Michigan’s laws went into effect in 2012 and Kentucky was well ahead of the game with legislation in 2000, but the first state to address telemedicine by law was actually Louisiana in 1995. 21 years ago?! Why was Indiana so late to answer the call?…

WHAT SHOULD INDIANA EMPLOYERS KNOW?
According to Mike Ripley, the Vice President of Health Care and Employment Law Policy at the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, it was surprising the law was not passed sooner, as it had many supporters. Ripley explained that insurance carriers, employers, and health care providers were ready to embrace telemedicine technology, yet the stakeholders could not agree on exactly how it should work in the Hoosier state.
The competing interests that delayed the law were ultimately united when the stakeholders agreed that the standard of care for a virtual visit would have to be the same as the standard of care for an in-person visit. Once all parties were able to rally around this central concept, the bill passed swiftly through the legislature. The standards of care at the heart of the bill are yet to be clearly defined in terms of telemedicine, but you may read the specific language of Indiana’s House Bill 1263 to gain a better understanding of the law.
Although the issues around the standards of care continue to develop, the law clearly states a phone call is insufficient to satisfy the standard of care. We anticipate technology such as video chatting and Skype will be used to effectuate the provision of care by telemedicine. The law also addresses the types of maladies that may (and may not) be treated through telemedicine. In Mr. Ripley’s words, one easy way to remember what is fair game under the bill is “anything ending with ‘-itis’ – is permissible to treat via telemedicine.” The law prohibits narcotic prescribing and psychiatric services through telemedicine.

Furthermore, see our recent blog about the importance of telemedicine, and its potential impact on many quality of life factors.

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