Road Funding Set for Conference Committee Showdown

The Chamber was pleased to see the Senate pass a long-term road funding bill (34-13). During the floor vote, the Chamber lobbying team worked to get additional votes for what might have been a much closer margin. Five Republican senators voted against the Chamber on HB 1002: John Crane (Avon), Mike Delph (Carmel), Aaron Freeman (Indianapolis), Jean Leising (Oldenburg) and Andy Zay (Huntington). One Democrat, David Niezgodski (South Bend), voted with the Chamber.

There are differences between the House and Senate proposals, however:

  • House version raises just over $1.1 billion per year; the Senate about $672 million a year.
  • House version converts all sales tax collected (well over $300 million) on fuel sales to road funding; the Senate does not.
  • House version has $15 annual registration fee for regular automobiles and $150 for electric cars; the Senate adds $75 fee for hybrids (the Chamber supports this addition).
  • House version has a 10-cent fuel tax increase for both gasoline and diesel fuel, with annual increase based on index from 2019-2024. The Senate phases in the fuel taxes: five cents per year for two years; diesel tax is three cents a year for two years. Both are indexed at no more than one cent a year per gallon from 2019-2014.
  • House version requires the Indiana Department of Transportation to seek a federal tolling waiver; the Senate says it may seek the same waiver but with the approval of the Governor.
  • Senate version contains a $5 per new tire sale use fee in addition to the current 25-cent fee; the House does not.
  • Senate version increases registration fees for trucks in lieu of additional diesel taxes.
  • Senate version adds a 10-cent per gallon aviation fuel excise tax, with revenue from that going to the airport development grant fund.

The “swim lanes” of the bill are now clearly defined. Work will continue during the next two weeks by the Chamber and our coalition partners to reconcile the differences between the two versions. We believe Indiana will finally end up with a long-term sustainable transportation infrastructure funding bill, one of our Indiana Vision 2025 goals.

Call to Action: Please contact your legislators to encourage them to support HB 1002. Let them know today that long-term funding is important to you and your company!

Get Your Motor Running for Transportation Funding

The long-awaited road funding bill (HB 1002, authored by Rep. Ed Soliday) arrived during the first week of session. It addresses the structural deficit of $1.2 billion per year for Indiana roads. The bill includes many good things that the Chamber supports; it is user-fee based and data-driven. While the bill will have changes during the next four months, we will work to support its basic concepts. The state’s situation: Over the years, technology (that led to better gas mileage) and inflation have combined to erode Indiana’s road maintenance dollars. Also, the last time the gas tax saw an increase was 2003. There will be a major hearing on this bill by the Roads and Transportation Committee on January 25 and the Chamber will be there to formally advocate its full support.

HB 1002 provides for a one-time fuel tax rate increase of 10 cents per gallon on gasoline  currently $0.18), special fuel tax (currently $0.16) and motor carrier surcharge tax (currently $0.11.) It also does the following:

  • Provides for an annual rate increase in fuel tax rates based on an annual index factor
  • Increases alternative fuel decal fees by 50%
  • Establishes a $15 transportation infrastructure improvement fee that applies to all motor vehicle registrations
  • Requires a person who registers an electric vehicle to pay a supplemental registration fee of $150 with an increase every five years based on an index factor
  • Provides that the gasoline use tax is distributed to highway funds over a phase-in period
  • Repeals restrictions on when a tolling project can be undertaken
  • Requires the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) to seek a Federal Highway Administration waiver to toll interstate highways
  • Permits INDOT to approve certain railroad crossing projects and authorizes the Indiana Finance Authority to finance an approved project subject to a maximum annual debt service limit of $10 million
  • Makes various changes to the transportation funding exchange program between the state and counties and municipalities