Students: Some Tips for Saving Money While You’re Still in School


87649503College is expensive. There is just no way to sugarcoat that. It’s not just tuition, room and board and textbooks. There are parking fees and printing fees. There’s pizza to buy, events to attend and t-shirts to order. Even with significant help from scholarships, grants and loans, my school bill is still nearly $10,000 a semester. This semester I was told I needed to buy an economics text book that would cost me almost $400! What could possibly make one textbook be worth $400?

In many ways, there is no avoiding the financial blows that college life will inflict, but I have compiled a list of eight really easy ways to save that might help ease the pain:

  1. Cool it on the Chipotle. I love the deliciousness of a burrito bowl as much as the next girl, but all of those fast food runs start to add up. Set a limit on the number of times you will eat fast food each week and then stick to it. Keep a few simple groceries in your room so that you will have the ability to avoid temptation when it strikes.
  2. Don’t buy your books from the bookstore. I totally get the convenience of it. I mean it’s right there within walking distance. But like I said, my bookstore tried to get me to buy an econ book for $400. Not cool. With just a little time management and advance preparation you can save HUGE amounts by buying your textbooks online. And that brings me to number three …
  3. It may not have to be the exact edition your professor is using. I am taking a constitutional law class this semester. The required text was the most current edition and it was over $200. I got on Amazon and bought the same book just a few editions removed for only $5. I mean, let’s be real, when was the last time the constitution changed? For the most part, “new” editions of text books are the same material just moved around a little.
  4. No more Starbucks. I love Starbucks. I mean, I love it a lot. The frothy goodness of a latte is good for the soul, but it’s also $5. Just like with the fast food runs, those pumpkin spice lattes will sneak up on you and before you know it you’ve spent $250 in one semester. (True story from my life – and no I am not proud of that.) During this season of your life, you may need to forget you ever heard of Starbucks. The lattes will still be there later when you can actually afford them.
  5. Find out where you can get a student discount. Local businesses love college students. Many places will give discounts or even free things if you just flash your student ID. Ask around your school and keep your eyes open in the local shopping venues. In addition, many national brands offer discounts to students — especially in the areas of electronics and software. And don’t forget to check into good student discounts for your automobile insurance!
  6. Don’t fall into the trap of online shopping. I know, it is so easy. You don’t even have to get out of bed. They’ll deliver it right to your door. Essentially online shopping is the greatest invention since, well, Starbucks lattes. Because it is so easy, online shopping has cost me big bucks in the past. Set a budget, tell your roommates, have someone tackle you when you pull up the Macy’s web site. Whatever you need to do, do it. Shopping therapy is not the way to get through the stress of college.
  7. Take advantage of the campus facilities. My school just built a big, beautiful recreational center and it is totally free to students. I mean kind of free… we do pay for it in our tuition. That’s the point, though; part of what we pay for in our school tuition are the great facilities and activities that our school offers. Take advantage of those rather than going out and spending more.
  8. Go to class. Okay, technically this doesn’t save you money. But it keeps you from wasting the money you are already spending. And mentally, going to class helps you learn to assign value to the investment you are making. You are paying for this class. Skipping it is like setting fire to money.

Most importantly, enjoy your time in school. Life is expensive, and college is kind of like a trial run on life. Learn how to budget now and “real life” will be much easier when the days of ramen noodles and wearing leggings as pants are gone.

Paige Ferise, a sophomore at Butler University, is interning in the Indiana Chamber communications department this fall.

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