New Indiana Fair Employment Poster a Required Change

The Indiana Fair Employment Poster (released by the Indiana Civil Rights Commission) has been changed to add veterans as a protected category and prevent discrimination against them. This stems from House Enrolled Act 1242.

It is against the public policy of the state and a discriminatory practice for an employer to discriminate against a prospective employee on the basis of status as a veteran by:
(1) refusing to employ an applicant for employment on the basis that the applicant is a veteran of the armed forces of the United States; or
(2) refusing to employ an applicant for employment on the basis that the applicant is a member of the Indiana National Guard or member of a reserve component.

We are updating our poster sets to comply with this mandatory change.

You can order our new Indiana state/federal poster sets online, or contact customer service at (800) 824-6885 or customerservice@indianachamber.com.

Better yet, make life much easier for yourself and join our FREE poster subscription service!

Congress Seeks Short-Term Fix to Highway Trust Fund Dilemma

The U.S. Congress voted last week to provide $10.9 billion to the U.S. Department of Transportation to fund the Highway Trust Fund in order to reimburse states for repairs and infrastructure improvements for roads, rails and airports.

The nearly $11 billion was cobbled together from general fund revenues by any number of budgetary gimmicks not rationally tied to the fuel (gasoline and diesel) excise taxes that normally go into the trust fund (e.g., an extension of customs fees as well as so-called “pension smoothing”).

Few lawmakers in the Indiana delegation (and the entire Congress for that matter) are happy that it is not a longer-term solution; those we spoke with were frustrated by the delay and the funding mechanisms. The Indiana Chamber agrees this is no way to conduct the people’s business, but it is better than the alternative of the highway fund going broke, work stoppages and the idling of hundreds of thousands of construction workers across the country. We will work with the delegation to secure a more rational bill and reauthorization of the multi-year surface transportation bill in coming months.

Indiana Chamber Endorses Four Members of Congress for Re-Election

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce is endorsing four members of the state’s congressional delegation from Central Indiana:

U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita (R-IN, 4th District);
U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks (R-IN, 5th District);
U.S. Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN, 6th District); and
U.S. Rep. Todd Young (R-IN, 9th District).

“Good public service deserves to be recognized. These members of Congress continue to demonstrate sound fiscal policy and prudent decision-making on issues that are vital to jobs and economic growth,” says Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar.

The Indiana Chamber’s nonpartisan congressional PAC determined the endorsements.

At both the state and federal levels, Indiana Chamber support is driven by vote scores on pro-jobs, pro-economy issues. For state endorsements, the Indiana Chamber relies on its Legislative Vote Analysis report. Congressional support is based on the vote tally conducted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Representatives of the U.S. Chamber, which also is supporting these candidates for re-election, joined the Indiana Chamber in downtown Indianapolis for today’s press conference.

The Indiana Chamber has been the state’s leading business organization for more than 90 years, representing over 800,000 Hoosier workers through nearly 5,000 member companies across Indiana.

The Importance of Remembering Our Goals

I can remember clearly the day that I sat down with my academic advisor at Hanover College and filled out the form that would officially brand me an English major. I was a sophomore, and I felt as if I had been waiting since the day I committed to Hanover to wear the English major label. I was eager to take the literary classes and the writing workshops, all preparing me to follow my dream of becoming a writer. At that moment, I wasn’t exactly sure what I wanted to write, but I was certain writing would play a major role in my future.

Writing has always been my passion and my dream. As my senior year continues to inch closer, I know that it’s almost time to try to make my dream a reality, which is both exciting and terrifying. I also realize that working toward my bigger career goals will take time.

I recently stumbled upon an article from Mashable entitled, “How to Reclaim Your Goals When the Path to Success Gets Foggy.” The article is targeted at those already in the workforce who may have lost sight of their goals, distracted by the day-to-day tasks of their job. While I may not be the intended reader for this piece, I think it’s important to keep in mind as I embark on my job search in the near future. And I think it’s important for everyone to remember their dreams and goals and to not give up even when the path gets obscured.

The main advice in the article is simply to remember your career goals and to invest time in them. It’s easy to cast your bigger dreams aside, promising that it is a task to be dealt with on another day. But it’s important to devote time to your goals, because it will take time to accomplish them.

Another issue that could present a roadblock is fear. This could include fear of success, fear of failure or fear of what people will think of you. These fears must be cast aside if you’re to follow your dreams.

Though the article presents advice that sounds familiar and even trite, I think it’s important to remind ourselves of all these things and to make sure that we aren’t forgetting about the dreams that probably led us to our jobs in the first place.

Anti-Bullying App Gets Microloan Boost

The current edition of BizVoice® magazine includes a story about the Madison County Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA), an after-school program for students in grades six to 12 that helps students learn how to brainstorm ideas for companies, present those companies to an investor panel and secure funding for their ideas.

As part of the YEA program, Pendleton Heights High School junior Brandon Boynton created an anti-bullying app called The Bully Box, which is marketed to schools and allows students to report acts of bullying anonymously, while allowing the school district to collect bullying data to help comply with anti-bullying laws and protect students.

Boynton’s app won the local contest held through the Madison County YEA program, as well as the regional contest in Boca Raton, Florida. He placed in the top six of a national competition at America’s Small Business Summit in Washington D.C. in June.

According to a press release from the Flagship Microloan Program, the app has also caught the attention of the microloan organization, which provides small loans of between $1,000 and $5,000 to businesses in a 10-county region of East Central Indiana. The program announced it will make a working capital loan to Most Beastly Studios, which produces The Bully Box app. The Flagship Enterprise Center, a technology incubator in Anderson, is a sponsor of the Madison County YEA program and is a partnership between the City of Anderson and Anderson University.

To raise additional capital for the app, Boynton is running a campaign via crowdfunding site IndieGoGo. His goal is to raise $25,000 by Sept. 24.

Also in Boynton’s toolbox is The Curfew Buddy – keeping parents and children connected quickly about where children are and when they’ll return home.

Kudos to this young Hoosier entrepreneur and the Madison County YEA program for giving Boynton and other enterprising students the experience and opportunity to change the world through their innovative products, services and ideas.

Waters of the United States Informational Meetings Around Indiana in August

The Indiana Chamber is working with the Indiana Farm Bureau and many other business and industry groups to strongly communicate our deep concern about the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers proposed expansion of federal regulatory jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act? This will expand federal control over Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) – to which we are opposed.

As you will see below, The Farm Bureau is holding a series of informational meetings around the state and YOU are invited. Be sure to register if you will be attending.

If you’d like more information, reach out to Justin Schneider (317-692-7835 or 317-919-8087) or Kyle Cline (317-692-7845 or 317-502-7415). The schedule is below, and here is the full listing that includes locations:

  • August 5: 2-4 p.m. in Tipton County
  • August 7: 9-11 a.m. in Decatur County
  • August 7: 7-9 p.m. in Randolph County
  • August 18: 10 a.m.- noon in Vigo County
  • August 18: 7-9 p.m. EST /6-8 p.m. CST in Jasper County
  • August 21: 1-3 p.m. in Marshall County
  • August 21: 7-9 p.m. in Dekalb County
  • August 28: 9-11 a.m. in Monroe County
  • August 28: 3-5 p.m. in Tippecanoe County

Turning to the ‘Dark’ Side Pays Off at Work

I’m not trying to compare successful business leaders’ climb up the corporate ladder to Anakin Skywalker’s epic descent into evil, but the title of my blog is fitting, according to a recent Wall Street Journal story.

Let me start by saying that my first reaction to this article is a bit – not indignant, but defiant. While I concede that the author’s contentions are dead-on in many cases, they are broad generalizations. That said, it’s an intriguing piece.

Read this excerpt and ask yourself if you know anyone with these “dark” personality traits:

… co-workers may possess a dose of one of the personality traits that psychologists call the “dark triad”: manipulativeness, a tendency to influence others for selfish gain; narcissism, a profound self-centeredness; or an antisocial personality, lacking in empathy or concern for others.

These traits are well known for the bad behavior that they can cause when dominant in people’s personalities. At milder levels, however, they can actually foster skills that can help people rise through the ranks.

For instance, people with narcissism, who want to be the center of attention, often make a good first impression on clients and bosses, says a 2014 review of more than 140 studies on people with mild, or “subclinical” levels of dark personality traits. They also can be persuasive when pitching their own ideas.

Manipulators influence others for their own gain, using flattery or deceit if necessary. But these personalities – also called Machiavellians – can also be charismatic leaders and forceful negotiators, says the study, in the Journal of Organizational Behavior. And while antisocial personalities lack empathy or concern for others, they can be creative because they often enjoy testing limits.

Does the story resonate with you or get under your skin? Chime in!

In the Rough or a Favorable Lie? Perspectives Vary on the State of Golf

My on and off affair with golf started when I was about 17, and has been somewhat tumultuous. Like many duffers, I’ll take some time off, then mosey out to the range after watching a PGA event on TV. Next thing you know,  the seductive temptress known as a promising round appears with her flowing hair as beautiful and dangerous as windblown fescue — and once again I’m hooked and helpless. Walter White himself might as well be running the clubhouse cash register.

Yet with viewership of the PGA’s major tournaments reportedly down — often credited to Tiger Woods’ absence (he’s battled serious injuries and hasn’t won a major since 2008) — and with Millennials more interested in soccer (and their smartphones), there’s been much speculation that the game’s popularity has dropped off like a shank over a Pebble Beach cliff. Many attribute it to the time commitment of an 18-hole round — and legend Jack Nicklaus even proposes a move to a 12-hole standard outing for amateurs.

However, findings portrayed in a recent Golf Digest article posit the game is not in as dire shape as some might have you believe. We hope this is the case for our members in the golf industry:

Contrary to popular belief, there are positive stories in equipment sales, rounds played, and even employment opportunities. The professional game might be on better financial footing than any other individual sport, and maybe most important, the game’s leaders have embraced the idea of growing the game in its most important way: young people. The story of golf in July 2014 certainly is not candy canes and rainbows, but those clouds might not be as dark as others have been so quick to point out.

Has 2014 been a down year for equipment sales and rounds played? Certainly. Is there an oversupply of golf courses (fueled by unsustainable real-estate projections) and golf-equipment inventory (driven by overzealous manufacturers who were primed by unrealistic sales forecasts from certain large-scale retailers)? Unquestionably. But that’s a relative and limited point of view. First, let’s remember this: There were about 5 million golfers in 1960. While U.S. population has increased only some 75 percent since then, the number of golfers has more than quintupled to around 25 million.

Recent data from golf-retail research firm Golf Datatech show that the sale of hard goods (clubs, balls, bags, shoes and gloves) through the first six months of the year are higher than or equal to 12 of the previous 17 years. Is the trend line down from the somewhat freakish highs of 2006-’08? Yes. But there are unquestionable categories of enthusiasm this year. Iron sales, the largest purchase a golfer makes, have been up this year. The wedge market, thought to be dead after the USGA rolled back groove performance, has been consistently up this year. Even the footwear market has been an important, steady source of revenue. Callaway Golf just announced its second-quarter earnings and noted its sales for the first half of 2014 were up 9 percent, with growth in all categories, including woods (up 8 percent), irons (up 14 percent), putters (up 9 percent) and golf balls (up 7 percent).

There have been arguments that television ratings for golf are down in 2014 (and indeed the majors have been off), but according to the PGA Tour, the number of unique viewers this year is consistent, and sponsorship interest across all tours has risen to unprecedented levels. Golf Channel set a ratings record for the month of April this year…

Bishop and other leaders believe young people are not only the catalysts for golf’s future, but the strongest elements of golf’s present. Finchem points to The First Tee reaching a record 3.5 million youngsters in the last year. That’s a powerful number when you realize that a traditional, outdoor, analog game like golf is somehow energizing a nation that is eschewing physical education, battling a growing childhood-obesity problem and fighting a culture that sees kids spending nearly eight hours a day in front of screens.

Foreign Investment Pays Off in Jobs

The Indiana Chamber has touted the advantages of foreign-owned establishments numerous times over the years. A new study looks at jobs generated by the foreign investment in the largest U.S. metro areas over the past 20 years.

In 1991, Indianapolis ranked 36th nationally with 21,190 jobs tied to foreign direct investment. In 2011, those numbers improved to a 22nd-place ranking and 49,910 jobs.

How about industries and locations? Aircraft products and parts topped the 2011 list (thanks largely to Rolls Royce), accounting for 7,600 jobs. Motor vehicle parts followed with 4,800 jobs. In line with those numbers, London and Tokyo, respectively, were the leading global cities serving as home for the Indianapolis-area investment.

The Brookings Institutions and JPMorgan Chase combined efforts on the research.