Engage Indiana: Event Shines Light on Using Business for Good

logo-400Our BizVoice magazine has highlighted corporate social responsibility throughout 2016. Here are some of those articles to date:

Prominent speakers will also be on hand Nov. 18 in Indianapolis at the Engage Indiana event to discuss the benefits of effective community engagement and advocacy strategy on the bottom line. Find out more information and register online.

Starting a Movement: Healthy Businesses Fuel Healthy Communities

Healthy Businesses Fuel Healthy Communities logo

Building on the successful Health Means Business event earlier this year is an upcoming program supported by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce Foundation and the Wellness Council of Indiana.

Healthy Businesses Fuel Healthy Communities is the focus on July 13 (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.) as the Indiana business and philanthropic sectors come together to explore how corporate engagement in community service can improve health for employees and all Hoosiers.

Take this opportunity to connect, learn from and collaborate with like-minded organizations and discuss ways you can work together to address health needs in your community.

Additional objectives include the following:

  • Learn about Indiana’s critical health needs and the social and economic factors contributing to them
  • Understand how corporate community service and wellness programs benefit both companies and communities
  • Understand how to leverage your internal resources to support wellness inside and outside your organization

Who should attend?

  • Business owners and leaders
  • Executives and program officers at corporate foundation
  • Individuals involved with corporate giving, cause marketing and corporate social responsibility programs (program managers, execs, marketing, sales or HR)
  • Individuals involved with corporate wellness initiatives (program managers, executives, marketing, sales or HR)

Learn more and register online. Contact Marie Beason at the Indiana Philanthropy Alliance at mbeason(at)inphilanthropy(dot)org or (317) 630-5200, ext. 115 with questions.

Folk Fest in Indy to Draw Many Bands, Raise Funds for a Great Cause on May 9

folkfestSome socially conscious business owners and volunteers in Indy’s Fountain Square area are working hard to promote the inaugural Virginia Avenue Folk Fest, which will raise funds for Trusted Mentors. Set for May 9, the festival will feature over 70 local bands and is already creating quite the buzz.

I’m proud to say that I was involved with Trusted Mentors as an adult mentor for three years, and now serve on its board of directors.

The program creates mentor/mentee matches to help at-risk adults establish stable lives by reducing the chaos brought about by poverty, homelessness, under-employment and the effects of incarceration. These person-to-person mentoring relationships improve lives by developing life skills and positive social networks that empower people to:

  • Remain housed
  • Make a positive contribution to the local community
  • Remain or become employed
  • Advance their education
  • Stay out of jail
  • Improve parenting skills

For more details about the event, check out this helpful FAQ. And we could still use more volunteers as well!

Hope to see you there, and please help us spread the word if you plan to attend by using the hashtag #folkinupindy. Folk yeah!

Rev(ving) Up the Month of May

????????????????????????May is always a special time in Central Indiana (and for many throughout the state) with the Indianapolis 500 and its surrounding activities.

One of the more recent additions to the itinerary is Rev,a high-energy charity event on May 2. What makes Rev (in its second year and presented by Fifth Third Bank) unique? It benefits a relationship between the racing community and IU Health Methodist Hospital that goes back more than 100 years.

From the hospital’s first motorized ambulance in 1910, to the first liftoff of its LifeLine helicopter in 1970, to today, IU Health Methodist Hospital and the IMS have worked together to promote the safety of racecar drivers and Hoosiers alike. Rev is a celebration of the continued partnership between these influential Indianapolis institutions.

Dine on driver-inspired cuisine prepared by Indy’s top chefs and enjoy a variety of music and entertainment while mingling with IndyCar drivers and racing legends. Experience a behind the scenes look at the yard of bricks, the acclaimed Borg-Warner trophy and Victory Podium and enjoy photo opportunities with Indianapolis’s finest vintage cars.

Funds raised will support Indiana University Health statewide trauma programs including medical services for drivers and patrons at the IU Health Emergency Medical Center of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

A limited number of premiere tickets remain available.

It’s Your Chance to be All-IN

The Indiana Humanities Council has a mission of encouraging Hoosiers to think, read and talk in order to connect people, open minds and enrich lives. It has been a partner of the Indiana Chamber in past programs and initiatives.

The Council has a question for Hoosiers: Are you ALL-IN? Find out by engaging in a series of challenges that will help you learn more about your state. It’s an important way of adding “doing” to the think, read and talk mission.

Companies and other organizations are already signing up for friendly competitions or to simply engage their employees.

Learn more and be ALL-IN.

Your Company Can Support New “Pass the Torch” Campaign for Women

The following is a guest blog from Sunny Bray, corporate events director for the Mentoring Women’s Network Foundation.

Mentoring Women’s Network, a community of empowered women supporting one another personally and professionally through mentoring relationships, is holding their inaugural event, “Pass the Torch for Women Luncheon,”  August 14 at the Ivy Tech Corporate College and Culinary Center.

Pass the Torch for Women is chaired by Traci Dolan of ExactTarget and an executive leadership team including senior representation from women from Angie’s List, Fifth Third Bank, Simon Property Group, First Merchants Bank, and many other companies.

The Pass the Torch for Women event is intended to inspire women to pledge to mentor and help develop one another personally and professionally, in order to create new opportunities and advance women in the workplace. Women are making advancements in the workplace and in business, yet we have much work to do to continue to advance women leaders.

Sponsoring this event provides your company with positive visibility and association with a well-regarded national organization. Sponsorship also creates access for your female employees to year-round programs and resources aimed at leadership development, connections and social responsibility.

More than 475 women of the greater Indianapolis business, medical and civic communities will attend the 2014 Pass the Torch for Women Event. Your participation in the Pass the Torch for Women Event affords you networking opportunities and additional benefits.

If you’re interested in supporting this program, contact me at sunny@mentoringwomensnetwork.com or (317) 575-4077.

Cinderella Ball in Zionsville to Help Good Causes

If you're not familiar with Bona Vista, it's a wonderful organization based in Kokomo that helps children and adults of varied abilities — and it helps many of those folks find employment. I actually interviewed Bona Vista President Jill Dunn for this January/February BizVoice story. The organization is now holding a fundraising event on Sept. 20 in Zionsville that looks to provide a fun evening for area fathers and daughters. See below for more information on the Cinderella Ball, and hopefully you can attend:

The Cinderella Ball is a fun-filled program designed to foster positive relationships between fathers and their young daughters. At the Royal Palace, our goal is to empower fathers to build foundations of self-confidence and self worth in our daughters that will help them grow into strong, independent young women.

Additionally, the Princess Power component of the program encourages our daughters to develop a compassionate nature and learn to share their blessings with the less fortunate in our communities.

We’ll help you create memories that will last a lifetime. All you have to do is join us!

The next ball will be held Friday, Sept. 20 at 6 p.m. in the Palomino Ballroom in Zionsville. For more information or to sign up, visit www.thecinderellaball.com.

(Re)Build it and They Will Come

I love history and art – not to mention a “feel good” story. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed writing a BizVoice® article last summer about restoration of Elkhart’s historic Lerner Theatre, one of many projects revolving around the city’s new downtown arts and entertainment district.

Renovation of the structure, built in 1924 as a vaudeville palace, was completed in June. It wasn’t transformation of the theatre alone that I found captivating. It was the “story within a story” – The Lerner’s rebirth revitalized Elkhart (helping to boost revenue and morale), one of those hit hardest during the economic downturn.

And the story continues.

Design firm Moody•Nolan and associate architect Cripe Design recently earned a Palladio Award (specifically the Sympathetic Addition Award) for their addition and façade restoration of the theater.

Jim Kienle, director of Moody•Nolan’s Historic Preservation Studio, was quoted in a 2010 BizVoice® story focusing on environmentally friendly preservation efforts involving restoration.

Looking forward to seeing what’s in store “in the next act” for The Lerner and other renovation projects.

People for Urban Progress Helping Indy Reuse — and Rethink

Indianapolis has seen many changes in the past decade. But as old, beloved structures are torn down to make way for new ones, People for Urban Progress (PUP) believes that material need not be wasted. PUP drew attention from citizens and media alike for reusing the RCA Dome rooftop and fabric from Super Bowl promotions, and is now garnering recognition for repurposing seats from the old Bush Stadium. I sat down with PUP Development Innovator Amy Crook to discuss the non-profit organization — which considers itself a "do-tank" — and how it's working to change the capital city.

Chamber: Tell me about PUP. When and why did it start?

Amy: It was founded by Michael Bricker, our chief innovator, and his business partner in 2008. At the time, there was talk of imploding the RCA Dome and they had a natural curiosity about what would happen to that "white stuff" on the roof. They wondered, "Can it be used for something else?" They learned more about what could be done with it. So they salvaged it, and the plan at the time was to make 1,000 bags out of it and other products – wallets, clutches, messenger bags. They raised $70,000 in selling these goods. Half of that went to designers who made the products, and we partnered with RecycleForce … and then the rest of the money went toward projects. Through that project, we put up two shade structures in the community in partnership with Indianapolis Fabrications and Keep Indianapolis Beautiful.

Do any other major cities have similar organizations?

Not that are a not-for-profit model that we’re aware of. … We’re going through a strategic planning process right now, so we are looking at places like Goodwill and TOMS Shoes – and locally, you could say that we have a similar model as Freewheelin', which allows kids to work on repairing bikes, and when they work so many hours, they actually get a bike. The bikes they work on are purchased by the community to raise money for the organization.

How many people work here?

Jessica Bricker, our product designer, is closest to full-time, and she is Michael’s twin sister. Michael works 8-10 months for PUP, but he’s also a production designer for film projects and may be called away for a month or two. I work for PUP three days a week and also do freelance marketing on the side. All of our designers are contracted. There are five of them and they all have full-time jobs.

How are you funded? Do you work with government or via grants?

We’ve been predominantly funded by the sale of products. But this strategic planning is (supported by) the first official grant that we’ve gotten from the Lilly Endowment to help us go through the process. We’ve applied for other grants to help us with material processing. A lot of people are coming to us for these large-scale projects like we’ve already taken on, such as salvaging 13 acres of RCA Dome material, five miles of Super Bowl fabric and 9,000 Bush Stadium seats. There’s this space in the middle that you can’t take to the recycling center, but you can’t put in the landfill either, so we just want to be able to restructure to be able to say “yes” to accepting more materials and trust that we can get them back in the community in a unique way.

Is the city paying you to place some of these Bush Stadium seats at bus stops?

It’s a partnership with IndyGo. IndyGo has a budget per seat amenity, and we’re raising sponsorship dollars for the other half. During the Seat Salvage Phase of the project, we had raised $10,000 from (four) funders to help us get more seats out with the tight deadline: Lumina Foundation, Central Indiana Community Foundation, Eskenazi Health and a private funder.

What’s the greatest challenge facing Indy right now that you’re working to solve, big picture-wise?

Our mission is promoting public transit, environment and design, and based on our research and conversations in the community and with community leaders, urban design and aesthetics have come out of that – an educational effort about what is good design. Michael is also co-chair of the Indy Rezone steering committee.

Transit is also important, of course. Since 2008, we’ve been working on getting a car sharing program started. And then there’s an environmental component – just being good stewards to the earth. The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra is going to be replacing their seats in June, and this has been the first project where people really think of us and contact us in advance to create a plan. Whereas with the dome and other projects, we found out late and then had to figure it out. But now people are talking with us to come up with plans, so they don’t have to scrap this stuff or throw it in a landfill.

Tell us about this Make 5X5 contest you just held.

The 5X5 Indianapolis arts and innovation came out of the Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF). The first one was hosted by Big Car, and we hosted the second one. The next one will be IndyHub. (CICF) came to us and gave us a budget to throw an event based on a theme, and we asked for five organizations to present a five-minute pitch on five slides, and the winner would get $10,000. So our theme was “Making.”

(The winner was the Cool Bus, which will serve as a literary center for children.)

What are some challenges in keeping an organization like this going, in accomplishing your goals?

We’re moving forward and there are some capacity issues, and if we had more people involved or more financial resources, we’d be able to get this stuff out in the community more quickly. But there is progress being made and we’ll be able to have a bigger impact.

Our strategic plan is called “Doing Things.” We took a risk and started this thing and we’re still here and making it happen; let’s take the next steps and create something other people can replicate. We’re keeping an eye on Minneapolis and Atlanta, where they have Teflon-coated fiberglass as their stadium rooftops. We don’t necessarily want to acquire that material, but we know what you can do with it so we want to have a seat at the table and help them find ways to use it in the community and process that material.

You support the mass transit initiative in Indianapolis. Why is that important?

All the articles I’ve been reading now about millenials and Gen Y, we aren’t all going to be homeowners and two-car families. Our salaries aren’t as grand, and our stability in our positions is different. But you’d be surprised, this generation is one of the smartest generations and they are spending within their means. They’re not buying fancy cars; they’d rather cut back and invest in their art, or having children – and invest in that versus things. A strong transit system would help foster that way of living. If you’re having children and you need two cars, and you don’t have a supplemental transit option, you’ll lose people and they’ll go somewhere where they don’t need a car. Our generation travels and experiences other cities, so when you see another city where travel is more efficient, you think about that.

For myself, in my first couple of jobs I was driving 45 minutes to work and back. Now I have a 1.5-mile walk to work. Once you try that, you don’t go back.

You think this type of organization would succeed in any other cities in Indiana?

We were just talking about Bloomington today and its new transit center, wondering how we could get some PUP seats there. While our mission statement is directly for Indianapolis, we’d like to see mini-PUPs, or people can come to us for a resource and we may have experience to help you do something in your community. Maybe it doesn’t have to be a full-time thing. We started with everyone doing this on the side. If there are seats being removed from a stadium or banners that need to be recycled, you can do that and we could consult about how to re-use those materials.

Do It Best Does It Right

Headquartered in Fort Wayne, Do It Best Corp. employs over 1,400 full-time staffers and can boast over 4,000 member locations throughout the United States and 53 countries. The lumber/hardware/building materials distributor's web site explains why it was founded back in 1945:

Do it Best Corp., formerly known as Hardware Wholesalers, Inc. (HWI), began as the vision of Arnold Gerberding. Born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1900, Gerberding worked in the hardware business from the time he graduated from high school in 1919. Working as a buyer, he faced many challenges and frustrations getting products at good prices to compete with the popular and rapidly growing catalog and retail chains like Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Montgomery Ward, Inc.

The company also believes in community service. Here are some examples of how Do It Best Corp. gives back to the communities it serves:

Big Brother, Big Sisters 
Do it Best Corp. has been involved for many years with Big Brothers Big Sisters, particularly in the Lunch Buddy program. Do it Best Corp. president emeritus Don Wolf was a co-founder of the Northeast Indiana chapter of BBBS. Both Don Wolf and Do it Best Corp. president emeritus Mike McClelland have served on BBBS’s national board of directors, as has Bob Taylor, our current president and CEO.

United Way
Do it Best Corp. has long been a strong supporter of the United Way. Staff participate in annual pledge drives to help fund the organization’s endeavors. The United Way partners with community groups and volunteers to help children, families, seniors, and people with disabilities improve their lives by helping to meet their basic and emergency needs.

Junior Achievement
Junior Achievement helps young people understand the economics of life through hands-on experience. JA brings the real world to students, opening young minds to their potential. Many Do it Best Corp. employees donate time and effort to helping today’s youth better understand today’s business environment, either by serving on the local board or by working as volunteer teachers. Do it Best Corp. also sponsors the Do it Best® store in the Fort Wayne Exchange City program, a miniature town in which local youth elect a mayor and operate businesses.

Study Connection
In 1989, Do it Best Corp. president emeritus Don Wolf founded the Study Connection program, a volunteer-based effort that provides tutoring and mentoring for young people in need. This nationally acclaimed program is now being duplicated in communities across America. For one hour each week during the school year, Do it Best Corp. staff volunteers meet one-on-one with local elementary school students identified by their teachers as needing extra assistance. Each year, teachers and volunteers nominate outstanding student participants for Don Wolf awards. Do it Best Corp. has long supported the growth and development of this program, and offers its Fort Wayne facility for on-site education.

Start! Heart Walk
The Start! Heart Walk is a non-competitive walking event to benefit the American Heart Association. Participants in local walks around the country raise funds for heart disease and stroke research and education; 150 Do it Best Corp. staff, along with family members and friends, participate each year, raising tens of thousands of dollars in pledges.

Relay for Life
The American Cancer Society Relay for Life is a team event that raises money for the American Cancer Society’s research and education efforts. Do it Best Corp. employees from both corporate headquarters and the retail service centers have participated in local Relay for Life events for many years.

Habitat for Humanity
In 2004, Do it Best Corp. selected Habitat for Humanity as its cause of choice. Habitat’s mission is to eliminate substandard housing around the world by providing decent, affordable shelter for those in need.