Tech Talk: Catching Up on Indiana Chamber Activity

A busy June at the Indiana Chamber of Commerce included items of importance to the innovation and entrepreneurship communities. A brief overview:

Indiana Vision 2025 Report Card
The every-other-year evaluation of our state’s economic performance includes the Dynamic and Creative Culture driver. Unfortunately, the statewide statistical measures don’t match up to the progress being seen in central Indiana and other select areas. Indiana is tied for 44th in the Kauffman Entrepreneurial Index and 35th in venture capital invested.

There are strong performances in university business spinouts, foreign direct investment and exports.

Full details and summaries at www.indianachamber.com/2025.

10th annual employer workforce survey 
While the Report Card showed some progress in educational measures, this survey reinforced the ongoing skills mismatch. Two numbers: 47% of respondents left jobs unfilled in the past year due to under-qualified applicants and 79% indicate filling their workforce is among their biggest challenges. Both trends have only increased over the past four years.

The survey also looks at workforce recruitment strategies, training and drug testing.

Details at www.indianachamber.com/education.

Coming Your Way

  • The July-August BizVoice® includes, among other features, visits to four co-working spaces around the state and a column on the green Internet of Things.•
  • Coming in mid-July is the new EchoChamber podcast. Technology and innovation will be one of the featured subjects. Catch a sneak preview at www.indianachamber.com/echochamber.

Brain Drain/Gain Workshop Yields Comprehensive Report

In late April, Purdue University partnered with the Indiana Chamber, Indiana INTERNnet and others to present a brain drain/gain workshop as part of the Chamber’s 53rd Annual Human Resources Conference. Panel discussions, presentations and more on the talent/skills gap were compiled into a comprehensive report. Read the full report.

It documents the workshop, including key takeaways and actions and is provided to those with an interest in these topics. Our aim is for the information in the report to be a resource for those working to make progress within their organization and forming collaborations with other stakeholders to move Indiana forward.

Where Are All the Workers?

While Indiana’s unemployment dipped to 3.6% last month, Utah is a full half point lower. The New York Times recently cites some of the challenges that brings. A few excerpts:

After eight years of steady growth, the main economic concern in Utah and a growing number of other states is no longer a lack of jobs, but a lack of workers. The unemployment rate here fell to 3.1%, among the lowest figures in the nation.

Nearly a third of the 388 metropolitan areas tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics have an unemployment rate below 4%, well below the level that economists consider “full employment,” the normal churn of people quitting to find new jobs. The rate in some cities, like Ames, Iowa, and Boulder, Colo., is even lower, at 2%.

That’s good news for workers, who are reaping wage increases and moving to better jobs after years of stagnating pay that, for many, was stuck at a low level. Daniel Edlund, a 21-year-old call center worker in Provo, Utah, learned on a Monday that his hours were changing. On Wednesday, he had his first interview for a new job.

But labor shortages are weighing on overall economic growth, slowing the pace of expansion in northern Utah and other fast-growing regions even as unemployment remains stubbornly high in Rust Belt cities like Cleveland and in regions still recovering from the 2008 recession, like inland California.

To Todd Bingham, the president of the Utah Manufacturers Association, “3.1 percent unemployment is fabulous unless you’re looking to hire people.”

“Our companies are saying, ‘We could grow faster, we could produce more product, if we had the workers,’” he said. “Is it holding the economy back? I think it definitely is.”

But the share of Utah adults who have withdrawn from the labor force remains higher than before the recession. Last year, 31.7% of adults in Utah were neither working nor looking for work, up from 28.2% in 2006. That is part of a broad national trend.

Chamber Report Card Shows State Is Moving Forward, But a Quicker Pace Required

While economic momentum continues in portions of the state, the Indiana Chamber’s Indiana Vision 2025 Report Card and 10th annual workforce survey clearly illustrate challenges that need both short- and long-term attention.

Among the findings: not enough skilled workers to meet economic needs; high rates of smoking and obesity that prove costly and impact quality of life; rising electricity prices; and a lack of statewide entrepreneurial activity and venture capital to support such efforts.

“There are a number of positive developments – both taking place every day and in our latest research – that are cause to celebrate,” says Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar. “But it is also evident that a lack of workers, unhealthy lifestyle choices and limited Indiana-based funding to grow promising companies is keeping the state from realizing its full potential.”

The Indiana Vision 2025 Report Card compares the 50 states on 62 metrics related to 36 goals grouped by four drivers: Outstanding Talent, Attractive Business Climate, Superior Infrastructure, and Dynamic and Creative Culture.

Overall, Indiana did better on the 2017 version than the 2015 Report Card. Improvement occurred in 36 metrics – up from 28 two years ago; Indiana also declined in 16 rankings, which was three less than in 2015. The state remained the same or there was no updated data available in eight metrics; that number was 12 in 2015. (Two metrics couldn’t be compared.)

Some of Indiana’s top performances include:

  • Business regulatory environment: Regulatory Freedom Index (2nd) and Small Business Policy Index (9th)
  • Early education: A variety of top 10 ranks in NAEP (National Assessment of Education Progress) test scores, particularly at the fourth-grade level
  • Exports: 10th among the 50 states, extending a string of similar rankings

The early education gains, however, are countered by a lack of workers in critical areas, including STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The Report Card reveals Indiana colleges and universities produce the third most science and technology degrees, but the state is only 42nd in the adult population with such degrees.

In addition, two troubling trends from the Indiana Chamber’s annual employer workforce survey continue:

  • The number of respondents that left jobs unfilled due to under-qualified applicants increased to 47% – from 39%, 43% and 45% the last three years
  • Those indicating that filling their workforce was their biggest challenge also increased – 29% after previous marks of 20%, 24% and 27%. Combine that with those answering next biggest challenge and the number soars to 79% – following totals of 72%, 74% and 76% the last three years

“Employers tell us, both through the survey and in their daily work experiences, that they simply can’t fulfill growth possibilities due to the lack of skilled workers,” Brinegar notes. “While many efforts are underway to prepare future employees and upgrade the abilities of those in the workforce today, those programs must be operated at the highest level of effectiveness and accelerated.”

The unhealthy lifestyle choices among Hoosiers carries a $6 billion annual price tag in increased health care costs and lost productivity. Indiana’s 20.6% adult smoking rate is an improvement over past years, but ranks 39th among all states. A six-rank improvement in adult obesity still leaves the state with a 36th-place rating and nearly a third of adults are considered obese.

Electricity prices, once considered a strong advantage for the most manufacturing-intensive state in the country, are now 29th for industrial customers and 26th for commercial. And while progress has been made on gathering data to avoid the water crises that have plagued others, the state must move quicker on regional planning and governance issues regarding future supplies.

In the important area of Dynamic and Creative Culture, momentum in central Indiana is overshadowed by poor statewide performance in a series of metrics, including: Kauffman Entrepreneurial Index (tied for 44th); job creation among new firms (44th); and venture capital (35th).

“Indiana must continue to make all areas of the state attractive destinations for workers and the companies that create jobs,” Brinegar concludes. “We’re encouraged by the regional cooperation that has emerged in recent years and look forward to enhancing our statewide performance and outcomes in future Report Cards.”

About Indiana Vision 2025
Mission: “Indiana will be a global leader in innovation and economic opportunity where enterprises and citizens prosper.” Indiana Vision 2025 was developed by a statewide task force of community, business and education leaders. The plan was released in early 2012. This third Report Card is available at www.indianachamber.com/2025.

About the Indiana Chamber Foundation’s Workforce Employer Survey
Sponsored by WGU Indiana, the 10th annual survey was conducted in partnership with Walker. More than 1,200 employers responded. Full results, including questions on workforce training and opioid use in the workplace, are available at www.indianachamber.com/education.

Statewide Discussions and Analysis
The 2017 Report Card and workforce survey will be the focus of six regional forums (to discuss the results, obtain local analysis and share best practices). The events are sponsored by Duke Energy Foundation; Indiana Michigan Power; NIPSCO, a NiSource company; and Vectren.

The forum schedule: June 6 (South Bend), June 7 (Hammond), June 27 (Sellersburg), June 28 (Indianapolis), June 29 (Evansville) and July 20 (Fort Wayne).

Give Your Skills a Workout During Summer Training Events

Just as a body needs exercise and a healthy diet to stay in top physical shape, skill sets also require regular training to achieve peak performance in the workplace.

The Indiana Chamber is offering several “workouts” in June and July covering topics such as the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), worker’s compensation, wage and hour laws, and more.

Stretch your mind with these June events (full listings at www.indianachamber.com/conferences):

Family Medical Leave Act Seminar (June 8), Ritz Charles in Carmel. Presented by Ogletree Deakins, this seminar is appropriate for new and experienced human resources professionals. Attendees will learn the responsibilities of FMLA and how to ensure a compliant workplace.

2017 Indiana Worker’s Compensation Conference (June 20), Hyatt Regency in downtown Indianapolis. Learn strategies to keep worker’s compensation premium rates low and how to handle worker’s compensation claims. Sponsors are Athletico Physical Therapy, the Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Kindred Healthcare. Additional sponsorships are available by contacting Jim Wagner at (317) 264-6876.

The French Lick Springs Hotel in French Lick will be the host site of two July training options. These two-day events take place July 20-21:

  • The Advanced HR Management Seminar was created in 2016 and inspired by feedback from previous conference attendees. Participants will learn about the significance of marijuana legislation and the opioid epidemic on the workplace. Key issues regarding FMLA and the Americans with Disabilities Act will also be discussed.
  • The Supervising and Managing People Workshop is ideal for new and experienced supervisors. Attendees can gain a better understanding of what is expected of a supervisor and will take a self-assessment test to measure performance in supervisory skills.

On July 27, the 2017 Indiana Wage & Hour Law Seminar will be held at the Indiana Chamber Conference Center in downtown Indianapolis. Presented by Ice Miller, this seminar will address tactics to keep your company in compliance with wage and hour laws. Attendees will receive updated information on potential federal changes.

See event pages for complete details. Continuing education credits apply in certain cases and count toward the Indiana Chamber’s Human Resources Specialist Certificate.

Take your training to the next level and register today by going online or by calling Nick at
(800) 824-6885.

References Still Really Matter

Allison & Taylor estimates that approximately 50% of all reference checks it conducts reflect some degree of employer negativity.

Here are five false perceptions that explain why countless job seekers go for months, or years, without landing that next job:

Myth No. 1:
Companies cannot say anything negative about a former employee.

Reality:
While countless companies have policies dictating that only title, dates of employment and salary history can be discussed, their employees – particularly at the management level – frequently violate such policies. Former supervisors are particularly notorious in this regard.

Myth No. 2
Most corporations direct reference check requests to their human resources departments, and they are trained to ensure that nothing negative will be said about me.

Reality:
Most human resources professionals will indeed follow proper protocol. However, be warned that some will not. When asked whether a former employee is eligible for rehire, some will indicate they are not – and may go on to explain why this is the case. Even if they indicate “not eligible” and offer no further explanation, a potential employee is unlikely to take the risk of hiring you without knowing the reason why a past employer has described you as ineligible for rehire.

Myth No. 3
Assuming HR has nothing negative to say about me, I should be “ok” with that company, reference-wise.

Reality:
Prospective employers have figured out that former supervisors are much more likely to offer revealing commentary about a company’s former employees. Your supervisor(s) knew you personally and has formed opinions about you, favorable or otherwise. When asked for their opinion, supervisors frequently forget, or are unaware of, company policies that typically instruct them to refer incoming reference inquiries to HR.

Myth No. 4
I should have my references listed on my resume and distribute them together.

Reality:
You never want to list your references on your resume, or indicate “References Provided Upon Request.” You do not want companies that may have little/no interest in hiring you bothering your references. What’s more, you may be wrongly assuming that the references you list truly “have your back.” Countless job seekers offer up the names of references that ultimately provide lukewarm or unfavorable commentary about them. The candidate should have a list of their references readily available (in the same format/font as their resume) to be given to prospective employers. When offered at the conclusion of an interview – in a highly professional format – it can create a very proactive (and favorable) ending impression.

Myth No. 5:
I took legal action against my former company and they are now not allowed to say anything.

Reality:
They may have been instructed not to say anything definitive, but do not put it past them to make your life difficult. There have been countless instances where a former boss or an HR staffer has said, “Hold on a minute while I get the legal file to see what I am allowed to say about this former employee.” Most employers are uncomfortable hiring someone who has a legal history, probably dashing your job prospects.

Work Share Continues to Get Cold Shoulder in Indiana

In December, the Chamber introduced the work share policy to the new chairman of the House Labor Committee, Heath VanNatter (R-Kokomo). He made no commitment to hear a bill but indicated that he would keep an open mind.

A work sharing program would allow employers to maintain a skilled stable workforce during temporary economic downturns. Employers then could reduce hours without layoffs, enabling workers to keep their jobs, which hopefully could be returned to full-time status once economic circumstances improve. Also part of the equation: unemployment compensation to partially compensate workers for their lost hours.

After several discussions with the Indiana Manufacturers Association (IMA), the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) and the Chamber, Rep. VanNatter decided to host a meeting with the three parties present. He later informed us that he was being told different things about the issue than what the Chamber was being told and wanted everyone in the room at the same time. Simply stated, the Chamber supports work share, but DWD and the IMA do not.

What Rep. VanNatter was able to do was get the IMA to admit in the Chamber’s presence that it was opposed to the bill. As a result, Rep. VanNatter didn’t feel that he could move forward with the two organizations in disagreement. In a subsequent discussion, he did say that he would like to study the issue (himself) this summer and then make up his own mind.

Over the course of the last five years, the bill has been heard twice but no vote has ever been taken. This is very frustrating for a measure that is a no-brainer and would garner bipartisan support – if it can ever make it to that point!

Chamber Unveils Rankings for Top 100 Best Places to Work in Indiana

These companies made people the priority in their workplaces with policies and practices geared toward employee satisfaction and success. And tonight, they were honored as the top 100 companies on the 2017 Best Places to Work in Indiana list.

Winners were selected in four categories. Taking top honors:

  • Small companies’ category (between 15 and 74 U.S. employees): Luther Consulting, LLC, a Carmel-based public health software company
  • Medium companies’ category (between 75 and 249 U.S. employees): Gregory & Appel Insurance, property and casualty risk management and employee benefit firm in Indianapolis
  • Large companies’ category (between 250 and 999 U.S. employees): Indianapolis-based Blue 449, an open source media company
  • Major companies’ category (1,000 or more U.S. employees): technology giant Microsoft Corporation, which has a local office in Indianapolis

Both Luther Consulting and Microsoft are repeats; this marks a record sixth time for Microsoft to take top honors. Meanwhile, Gregory & Appel Insurance and Blue 449 make their first-place debut.

“These four companies excel in respecting their employees, providing them with the tools to be successful and offering careers – not just jobs,” states Indiana Chamber President Kevin Brinegar.

“Every company on this list understands the positive business impact of making employees feel valued. We are pleased to recognize them for such model work environments.”

Winners were sorted into four categories: small, medium, large and major companies. Out-of-state parent companies were eligible to participate if at least 15 full-time employees are in Indiana.

The 2017 Best Place to Work in Indiana companies range in Hoosier employee count from 15 (SMARI, a consulting firm in Indianapolis) to more than 1,700 (Horseshoe Casino in Hammond).

At the dinner, presented in partnership with Hylant, representatives from all designated companies received Best Places to Work awards of excellence.

Organizations on this year’s list that have displayed sustained excellence during the program’s 12-year history received additional recognition with Best Places to Work in Indiana Hall of Fame and Pinnacle designations.

Hall of Fame companies are those that have been named a Best Place to Work in Indiana at least two-thirds of the time in the program’s history; a total of 15 organizations on the 2017 list meet that criteria. Two companies – Edward Jones and Katz, Sapper & Miller – have made the Best Places to Work list all 12 years of the program.

The Pinnacle designation is reserved for those that have finished first in their category three or more times in a five-year period. The four Pinnacle companies are Edward Jones (tops in the large employer category from 2006-2008); Hollingsworth & Zivitz, P.C. (first in the small employer category from 2011-2014); Microsoft (tops in the major employer category in 2013-2014, 2016-2017 and in the large employer category in 2011-2012); and Sikich LLP (first in the large employer category from 2013-15).

More information about the Best Places to Work companies is available via a special section of the May/June issue of the Indiana Chamber’s BizVoice® magazine, a statewide publication released tonight and accessible online at www.bizvoicemagazine.com.

Other program partners are Inside INdiana Business with Gerry Dick, the Best Companies Group, Indiana State Council of SHRM and the Wellness Council of Indiana.

In addition to Hylant, Best Places to Work in Indiana is sponsored by: Moser Consulting; Eaton Corporation; Hancock Regional Hospital; Human Capital Concepts; OurHealth; and Smithville.

The Best Places organizations were determined through employer reports and comprehensive employee surveys. The Best Companies Group, which handled the selection process, oversees similar programs in 29 other states.

All companies that participated in the 2017 Best Places to Work program receive an in-depth evaluation identifying strengths and weaknesses according to their employees. In turn, this report can be used in developing or enhancing employee retention and recruitment programs.

For more information on the Indiana Chamber’s Best Places to Work program, go to www.bestplacestoworkIN.com.

The full list of the 2017 Best Places to Work in Indiana companies by ranking:
*Hall of Fame companies

**Pinnacle companies

Small Companies (15-74 U.S. employees)
Company / Primary Indiana Location
1. Luther Consulting, LLC / Carmel
2. SMARI / Indianapolis
3. E-gineering / Indianapolis
4. JA Benefits, LLC / Bedford
5. DK Pierce / Zionsville
6. American Income Life Indiana / Indianapolis
7. Indiana CPA Society / Indianapolis
8. eimagine / Indianapolis
9. Hanapin Marketing / Bloomington
10. Cripe / Indianapolis
11. mAccounting, LLC / Indianapolis
12. Jackson Systems / Indianapolis
13. Leaf Software Solutions / Carmel
14. Lakeside Wealth Management / Chesterton
15. University High School of Indiana / Carmel
16. CleanSlate Technology Group / Carmel
17. Visit Indy / Indianapolis
18. Bloomerang / Indianapolis
19. Weddle Bros. Construction Co., Inc. / Bloomington
20. Williams Creek / Indianapolis
21. The Skillman Corporation / Indianapolis
22. Magnum Logistics, Inc. / Plainfield
23. Pondurance / Indianapolis
24. Lessonly / Indianapolis
25. Apex Benefits / Indianapolis
26. Schmidt Associates* / Indianapolis
27. Indesign, LLC* / Indianapolis
28. Delivra, Inc. / Indianapolis
29. Community First Bank of Indiana / Kokomo
30. BLASTmedia / Fishers
31. Inovateus Solar LLC / South Bend
32. LHD Benefit Advisors / Indianapolis
33. Grote Automotive Inc. / Fort Wayne
34. CENTURY 21 Scheetz / Multiple locations
35. Sharpen / Indianapolis
36. netlogx LLC / Indianapolis
37. Oak Street Funding LLC / Indianapolis
38. Emarsys North America / Indianapolis
39. FirstPerson / Indianapolis
40. T&W Corporation / Indianapolis
41. General Insurance Services / Michigan City
42. VOSS Automotive / Fort Wayne
43. Conner Insurance / Indianapolis
44. Peepers by PeeperSpecs / Michigan City
45. OfficeWorks / Fishers
46. Ambassador Enterprises / Fort Wayne
47. Network Solutions, Inc. / Granger
48. Goelzer Investment Management, Inc. / Indianapolis
49. Design Collaborative / Fort Wayne

Medium Companies (75-249 U.S. employees) (21)
1. Gregory & Appel Insurance / Indianapolis
2. Purdue Federal Credit Union / West Lafayette
3. National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies (NAMIC) / Indianapolis
4. Software Engineering Professionals (SEP)* / Carmel
5. IDSolutions / Noblesville
6. American College of Education / Indianapolis
7. First Internet Bank / Fishers
8. Elements Financial Federal Credit Union / Indianapolis
9. Merchants Bank of Indiana and PR Mortgage & Investments / Carmel
10. J.C. Hart Company, Inc. / Carmel
11. Blue Horseshoe / Carmel
12. Allegient, LLC / Indianapolis
13. SkillStorm / Indianapolis
14. HWC Engineering, Inc. / Indianapolis
15. Sheridan Community Schools / Sheridan
16. Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice of the Wabash Valley / Terre Haute
17. WestPoint Financial Group* / Indianapolis
18. Indiana Oxygen Company / Indianapolis
19. Moser Consulting, Incorporated / Indianapolis
20. PAN Performance Assessment Network / Carmel
21. Peoples Bank SB / Munster

Large Companies (250-999 U.S. employees) (19)
1. Blue 449 / Indianapolis
2. FORUM Credit Union / Fishers
3. Kemper CPA Group LLP / Multiple locations
4. Katz, Sapper & Miller, LLP* / Indianapolis
5. Impact Networking / Indianapolis
6. Sikich LLP* ** / Indianapolis
7. SmartIT / Indianapolis
8. Duke Realty Corporation* / Indianapolis
9. Blue & Co., LLC* / Carmel
10. Hylant / Multiple locations
11. Hosparus Health / New Albany
12. Monarch Beverage / Indianapolis
13. Brotherhood Mutual Insurance Company* / Fort Wayne
14. Ontario Systems / Muncie
15. IPMG / West Lafayette
16. Traylor Bros., Inc. / Evansville
17. Centier Bank / Merrillville
18. AssuredPartners NL / New Albany
19. American Structurepoint, Inc. / Indianapolis

Major Companies (1,000+ U.S. employees) (11)
1. Microsoft Corporation* ** / Indianapolis
2. Edward Jones* ** / Statewide
3. Colliers International / Indianapolis
4. Horseshoe Casino / Hammond
5. Salesforce* / Indianapolis
6. Aerotek / Multiple locations
7. Blackboard, Inc. / Indianapolis
8. RCI* / Carmel
9. Turner Construction Company / Indianapolis
10. Capital Group* / Carmel
11. Cushman & Wakefield* / Indianapolis

Two Earn Honor as HR Professionals of the Year

Sometimes two is better than one and that’s especially true when it comes to recognizing two long-time leaders in the field of human resources with one of the industry’s top honors.

On Wednesday, Cari L. Kline of Grundfos Americas Corporation (Indianapolis) and Kendra L. Vanzo of Old National Bank (Evansville) were named the 2017 Ogletree Deakins Human Resources Professionals of the Year during the Indiana Chamber’s 53rd Annual Human Resources Conference & Expo in Indianapolis.

Kline and Vanzo received the honor that is given annually to a human resources professional that provides lasting impact through the implementation of best practices, organization design and effectiveness and accomplishment of the company’s strategic direction.

This is only the second time the award has been bestowed upon two deserving individuals; the first was in 2015.

Also honored at the luncheon and receiving the Award of Excellence was Lori L. Gooding, vice president of human resources for Buckingham Companies (Indianapolis).

Cari L. Kline

Cari L. Kline
Kline is regional director of human resources, Americas operations for Grundfos Americas Corporation and is based in Indianapolis. Grundfos is a $4.5 billion company and global leader in advanced pump solutions and water technology, with headquarters in Denmark.

After joining Grundfos in 2012 as human resources director for the company’s Peerless Pump business unit in Indianapolis, she was promoted into her current position and oversees human resources for all of the Grundfos operations facilities in North and South America. As a strategic business partner, Kline provides leadership on a broad range of issues and has implemented key initiatives throughout the company’s Americas operations.

“I am flattered to be honored (with the award),” Kline adds. “I think HR is one of the most unique and challenging professions in today’s business environment. The variety of opportunities and issues that present themselves – sometimes even in a single day – can be astonishing and I find that hugely motivating. I learned many years ago to stop saying, ‘Now I have seen it all!’”

Kline holds an MBA from Ball State University and an undergraduate degree from Purdue University.

Kendra L. Vanzo

Kendra L. Vanzo
Vanzo, executive vice president of associate engagement and integration for Old National Bank, has been with the company since 1994. Old National Bank has $14.9 billion in assets and more than 200 branches in Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky and Illinois.

Old National Bank President and CEO Bob Jones nominated Vanzo for the award. His nomination letter highlights several initiatives in the past year that Vanzo led for the company, including the largest merger in the company’s history. She also implemented a system to simplify training and career development, and she is credited for spearheading the creation of an employer-sponsored health clinic for associates and families.

In addition, Vanzo leads the company’s mission to hire and retain diverse individuals, including active military, veterans and individuals with disabilities.

She credits her team and the values at Old National Bank for her honor.

“This recognition is reflective of the contributions of our entire HR team and the people-first, ethical culture of Old National. I am humbled and honored to accept it on behalf of our HR team and company,” Vanzo offers.

She received an MBA from the University of Southern Indiana and her undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois.