Mo Rocca Cites Benjamin Harrison Home Experience in Commencement Speech

Humorist and “CBS Sunday Morning” correspondent Mo Rocca recently advised graduates of Sarah Lawrence College to not panic if they don’t yet know what their professional lives will hold. In his anecdotes, he mentions how an experience at the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site (in downtown Indianapolis) among other historic homes gave him a new perspective on passion.

Also noteworthy: “Do not take romantic advice from people who have been single for more than five years, or divorced more than twice.”

Telemedicine Movement Moving Forward in Indiana

Virtual doctor measures blood pressure

Our friends at Gibson Insurance posted a blog today about the advancement of telemedicine in Indiana. They also included comments from Indiana Chamber VP Mike Ripley:

Prior to March 21, 2016, Indiana was one of just a handful of states that had not legislatively addressed the subject of telemedicine. Meanwhile Illinois and Ohio currently have proposed telemedicine parity bills but nothing set in stone – and Wisconsin has no parity legislative activity at this time. Michigan’s laws went into effect in 2012 and Kentucky was well ahead of the game with legislation in 2000, but the first state to address telemedicine by law was actually Louisiana in 1995. 21 years ago?! Why was Indiana so late to answer the call?…

WHAT SHOULD INDIANA EMPLOYERS KNOW?
According to Mike Ripley, the Vice President of Health Care and Employment Law Policy at the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, it was surprising the law was not passed sooner, as it had many supporters. Ripley explained that insurance carriers, employers, and health care providers were ready to embrace telemedicine technology, yet the stakeholders could not agree on exactly how it should work in the Hoosier state.
The competing interests that delayed the law were ultimately united when the stakeholders agreed that the standard of care for a virtual visit would have to be the same as the standard of care for an in-person visit. Once all parties were able to rally around this central concept, the bill passed swiftly through the legislature. The standards of care at the heart of the bill are yet to be clearly defined in terms of telemedicine, but you may read the specific language of Indiana’s House Bill 1263 to gain a better understanding of the law.
Although the issues around the standards of care continue to develop, the law clearly states a phone call is insufficient to satisfy the standard of care. We anticipate technology such as video chatting and Skype will be used to effectuate the provision of care by telemedicine. The law also addresses the types of maladies that may (and may not) be treated through telemedicine. In Mr. Ripley’s words, one easy way to remember what is fair game under the bill is “anything ending with ‘-itis’ – is permissible to treat via telemedicine.” The law prohibits narcotic prescribing and psychiatric services through telemedicine.

Furthermore, see our recent blog about the importance of telemedicine, and its potential impact on many quality of life factors.

Elon Musk: We Are Most Definitely Living a Simulation Exercise

Elon Musk had an interesting answer when asked if we are living in someone else’s simulation: “The odds are one in billions that we are in base reality.” Sooooooo, yeah.

Here’s the full interview with the always-intriguing Musk at the 2016 Code Conference in California this week (click “PLAY ALL” in the image):

Hoosier Author John Green on the “Joys” of Adulthood

John Green, the well-known Indianapolis-based author of “The Fault in Our Stars,” “Paper Towns” and other modern literary hits, recently spoke to the graduating class of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio.

He’s articulate as always and waxes philosophical on the monotony of adulthood, but explains why that monotony does have a purpose in advancing society.

Telemedicine a Potentially Healthy Benefit of Broadband Access

Virtual doctor measures blood pressure

For the upcoming July/August edition of BizVoice, I spoke with Smithville Fiber Executive Vice President Cullen McCarty about developments in broadband — both in Indiana and around the globe.

One aspect he mentioned was the significant impact on health broadband access could play for Americans living in rural areas as telemedicine capabilities increase.

“The importance is having the ability to stay at home and talk with your doctor from there, whether it’s through FaceTime or some type of interactive technology,” McCarty says. “You can have a doctor’s visit without a stethoscope. You can take blood pressure over a device and have that information shot back to the doctor.”

Fitbits and Apple Watches may also be able to transfer diagnostics to doctors as well, he adds, noting aging Hoosiers will need to take advantage of all avenues to increase medical efficiency.

“In Southern Indiana, a lot of hospitals and clinics are a far drive for some in rural areas, like Orange and Greene Counties,” McCarty offers. “It takes a lot of gas and money, so I think that’s where telemedicine will take off. Plus, you have specialists who read X-rays. An example we were given several years ago is that there are people in other parts of the country and the world who read X-rays, and they send it back to the doctor.”

He relays an example of someone getting an X-ray in Bloomington and having it sent to a radiologist who lives on a golf course in Texas.

“There are many different applications for telemedicine,” McCarty points out. “I think it’s a big driver in getting broadband into people’s homes who don’t see the value yet.”

Long-Awaited Overtime Rule is Issued; Opponents Weigh In

If you’re in or around the world of HR, you’ve been awaiting the details of the new overtime rule within the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) — effective Dec. 1. This was done at the behest of President Obama, and executed by the Secretary of Labor. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the new rule will:

  • Raise the salary threshold indicating eligibility from $455/week to $913 ($47,476 per year), ensuring protections to 4.2 million workers
  • Automatically update the salary threshold every three years, based on wage growth over time, increasing predictability
  • Strengthen overtime protections for salaried workers already entitled to overtime
  • Provide greater clarity for workers and employers

Here’s a video of Secretary Tom Perez explaining and advocating for the new rule:

Let it be known that not all are so enthusiastic, however. Opponents – a list that includes us at the Indiana Chamber, the U.S. Chamber, Society for Human Resource Management, many legislators and policy institutes  assert the new rule is unreasonable for several reasons, including the fact that some employees will lose their coveted professional exempt status.

UPDATE: Here’s more information from the U.S. Chamber on why this measure is so onerous. 

A Big Jump in the Minimum Wage: Will It Help or Hurt Low-Skilled Workers?

Reason.TV’s Nick Gillespie sat down with George Mason University economist Don Boudreaux to discuss raising the minimum wage and its impact on not just businesses, but workers.

Some states and cities have moved to increase their minimum wage to $15, and results have yet to be determined. Boudreaux is adamantly against the increase, however, and expects many workers will lose not only their jobs, but opportunities to gain skills to move up the economic ladder.