Communicating Change in Obama’s White House

PR Junkie has a pretty interesting post up today about the Obama administration and its communication strategy. Like me, many Americans are anxious to see if the administration holds true to its campaign promise of government transparency. 

This article contends the administration itself is communicating the transition and possibly circumventing the print media altogether:

So does Obama’s popularity and promise of change mean a return to print readership in America? Maybe inside corporations, but not among the general population. In fact, it seems an Obama administration may bury print newspapers.

The same day Torr’s article ran on Ragan.com, The Washington Post published a story about the Obama administration’s plans for reaching around the media to communicate with citizens.

“Obama aides and allies are preparing a major expansion of the White House communications operation, enabling them to reach out directly to the supporters they have collected over 21 months without having to go through the mainstream media,” The Washington Post reported …

Kennedy invigorated and solidified TV as a medium; Obama will do the same for Web 2.0. If you haven’t already, check out his transition Web site, Change.gov. Among the many features is a blog, constantly updated newsroom, information on the growing list of appointees and, perhaps most importantly, an online suggestion box.

To see the Obama transition team’s blog, visit it here.

New Indy Airport Takes Off

It’s big. It’s more convenient. And it’s the first major airport erected in the country since 9/11.

The new Indianapolis Airport opened yesterday, with the first departures hitting the friendly skies today. While the project cost over $1.1 billion, its executive director, John Kish, stresses the fact that no state or local tax dollars were used.

But what will this development mean for the business community? Back in September, we featured the airport in BizVoice. Read all about it here.