INVESTIndiana Returns Sept. 23

Leading Indiana companies will participate in the fourth INVESTIndiana Equity Conference on September 23 at the Conrad Indianapolis.

Fund managers, analysts and institutional investors are primary attendees, with the event open to others in the business community. An Executive Roundtable opens the day. The keynote speaker is William Testa of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Twelve companies, including six financial institutions, are scheduled to make presentations.

They cover the state, including 1st Source Corporation (South Bend), Escalade (Evansville), Hillenbrand (Batesville) and nine others. Full information and registration is available online.

Ball State’s Namesakes Subjects of New Documentary to Premiere Sept. 25

Ball State University has become a state institution with quite a reputation for producing very skilled graduates. But you might not know much about its history. A group of students hope to remedy that with a new film project. Ball State reports:

A student-produced documentary will explore the impact the five Ball brothers have had on east central Indiana since the 1880s, when they moved their glass manufacturing business from Buffalo to Muncie — transforming the community into an industrial force in the Midwest. “A Legacy Etched in Glass: The Ball Brothers in Muncie” is an immersive learning project by Ball State University under the direction of Chris Flook, a telecommunications instructor. The film explores the lives of the five brothers, the family legacy in Muncie and the core values that propelled them to success: hard work, philanthropy, entrepreneurship and beneficence. The story weaves cinematography, motion graphic animation and archived material with interviews from historians. Building their factories on the south of side of Muncie, the Ball brothers expanded their operations enormously over several decades in the early 20th century. Even after the natural gas ran out, Ball Corp. continued to produce glass in Muncie well into the 20th century. Ball Corp. spun off two enterprises — today known as Jarden and the Ardagh Group — before moving fully to Colorado in the late 1990s. Ball Corp. currently focuses on avionics and beverage container manufacturing. “Legacy” not only explores the lives of all five brothers, their wives and other family members, but it also explores the wide-ranging philanthropic efforts of the family in Muncie over the past 120 years. The documentary will have its public premiere at 6 p.m. Sept. 25 at Minnetrista.

Watch a preview of the documentary, and learn more about the project online.

Chris Flook, who also serves as executive producer, may be reached at caflook@bsu.edu or 765-730-0841.

Will the Real ‘Rosie the Riveter’ Please Stand Up?

pGrowing up, I loved visiting my grandmother Dorothy’s house (we affectionately called her Dot – not grandma! She said it made her feel old).

Not long before she passed away, I noticed a picture of Rosie the Riveter in her living room. I don’t know why I hadn’t observed it before. It was so fitting.

She was one of the six million women Rosie represents who joined the workforce during World War II to replace American men who had enlisted. She was tough. She was patriotic. And she exemplified Rosie’s mantra that “We Can Do It.”

If Rosie had been a real person, the two would have undoubtedly shared a kinship.

Wait! Rosie the Riveter was a fictional character?

Well, yes and no … but mainly yes.

This fascinating History Channel video tells Rosie’s story.

A few fun facts:

  • Between 1940 and 1945, the female demographic in the United States workforce jumped from 27% to 37%. Half of those women held jobs in the defense industry.
  • The original depiction of Rosie was painted by Norman Rockwell and appeared in the 1943 Memorial Day issue of the Saturday Evening Post. His inspiration? A dental hygienist named Mary Keefe.

‘Indiana Competitiveness: What Works’ Event Set for Sept. 15 in Lafayette

Ivy Tech’s Lafayette campus will host Indiana Competitiveness: What Works on Monday, Sept. 15. The event, hosted by GE and Ivy Tech, will feature remarks from Rep. Todd Rokita and a keynote address from a senior leader at GE.

Additionally, there will be a panel discussion and networking opportunities for supply chain leaders and current and prospective suppliers. Speakers will discuss the state of manufacturing in Indiana and how it can be enhanced to compete in a global economy. Rep. Susan Brooks will also be in attendance and other members of Congress have been invited.

Details:
When: Monday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Where: 3101 S. Creasy Lane in Lafayette
RSVP: If you plan to attend, RSVP to Sydney.Stone@ge.com by Sept. 12 with your name, title, organization and email address.

Education Off the Playing Field

FKudos to the Indiana University Kelley School of Business for the recent announcement of a partnership with the National Football League Players Association. Career development, certificate and degree graduate level program options are part of the mix for current and former players.

Preparing young people for life off the field is a very good thing. Astonishingly, media reports have indicated as many as three-quarters of NFL players are bankrupt within five years of retirement. Details are in this press release.

This is only the latest example of Indiana institutions and businesses working with athletes. The current BizVoice magazine spotlights Indiana University East and its online program for tennis players (including Venus Williams) and the Language Training Center’s work with LPGA golfers.

A Baby in a Big Girl World

As only a sophomore at Butler University, I never dreamed that I would be interning anywhere, let alone for the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, and I definitely did not imagine myself wearing dress pants. All of those things are happening.

As my not-so-relaxing summer of being a nanny was coming to a close, I was contacted via Indiana INTERNnet about a possible internship here at the Chamber. I was ecstatic. From the little I knew about the position, it involved two of my favorite things: writing and Indianapolis. As a born and raised Hoosier, I am passionate about all things Indiana and I especially love our beautiful Indianapolis. As a communication major, this job was the perfect stepping off point for my future career goals. The idea of working here was overwhelming.

So here I am. Today is day two. I am in fact wearing dress pants, and I have so far loved every minute of this experience. Not only is this internship going to better my writing skills, it will also be introducing me to the business world that I will be joining in just a few short years.

Though this is all still very new for me, and there is still a “teen” attached to the end of my age, I am thrilled to be given this opportunity. I can’t wait to see what the coming weeks have in store.

Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership Opening Up New Business Opportunities

GDo you know what TTIP is and what it could mean for your business? Answers will be provided in a September 26 half-day session at the Lilly Center Auditorium in downtown Indianapolis. The Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership is a comprehensive agreement being negotiated between the United States and the European Union.

The answer to the second part of the opening question is that it can, in the words of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, “help unlock opportunity for American families, workers, businesses, farmers and ranchers through increased access to European markets for American goods and services.”

The Trans-Atlantic Business Council is presenting this informative program in conjunction with Eli Lilly and Company and the Indiana Chamber. Indiana Congressman Todd Young (R-9th District) will be among the speakers. Two panel discussions will focus on the regional impact of international trade, as well as company executives sharing export and foreign direct investment success stories.

The program will conclude at 11:15 a.m. There is no cost to attend, but registration is required.

Wellness Summit Preview: Your Employees’ Financial Stress is Your Financial Stress

19151085Hopefully you know by now that your employees’ financial problems are your financial problems. The financial stress that comes with financial ills can wreak havoc on productivity and worksite decision-making. As an employer, not only should you know this, but you should have a financial wellness plan in place to help your employees get back on their feet and get their head back in the game. But what if your corporate policies are the cause of financial stress?

Employers don’t realize that some seemingly benign corporate decisions can turn their employees’ financial lives upside down. At this year’s 2014 Indiana Health and Wellness Summit, I’m going to teach you exactly what corporate decisions to avoid and how to identify whether or not your current financial policies are a problem. Employees are fully responsible for their own financial success, but you can support them in their journey by having a great financial wellness strategy. Don’t miss my session on October 7 as we have a very frank and poignant conversation about your employees’ financial lives.

Peter Dunn, a.k.a. “Pete the Planner,” is an award-winning comedian and an award-winning financial mind. He released his first book, What Your Dad Never Taught You About Budgeting, in 2006 and is the host of the popular radio show “The Pete the Planner show” on 93 WIBC FM. Pete is also the resident Fox59 News personal finance expert and has appeared regularly on Fox News, Fox Business, CNN Headline News and numerous nationally syndicated radio programs.

Financial Fitness for Freshmen

The following Money Management column is provided jointly by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Indiana CPA Society as part of the CPA profession’s nationwide 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy program.

As you get ready to go away to college for the first time, this is a good time to expand your knowledge of day-to-day money management, including smart budgeting and debt management steps. The Indiana CPA Society offers these tips to students who want to get through college with the right financial footing.

Start on a Budget

You may be surprised at the high everyday costs of college, including books and supplies, daily living expenses and travel to and from school. That’s why it’s a good idea to get a sense of what you will spend – outside of tuition costs – before you begin each semester. Include savings you plan to use, any money you may receive from your family and the income you can expect from any jobs.

According to a Nationwide survey, the average student income is about $1,400 a month from part-time jobs and parents. Semesters usually last about four months, so divide your projected total to determine how much you can spend each month, after deducting the amount you can expect to pay for books at the beginning of the semester. It’s also a good idea to track your actual spending throughout the semester, so that you can more accurately project and adjust your budget for the years to come.

Get What You Need

Once you know your income, determine a list of expected expenditures each month. Be sure to remember the difference between wants and needs. Textbooks and supplies are clearly mandatory, but weekend trips, nights out and new clothes are not. Even a car can quickly drain your resources if you’re cash strapped.

Feed the Pig, the AICPA’s financial literacy site aimed at young people, recommends recording every time you make a purchase so that you get a good sense of where your money goes. Then categorize all the items, to see if you’re spending as much on morning coffee as you are on weekend entertainment. These steps allow you to understand where you might need to cut back or reconsider your spending choices. If you’re honest about your real necessities, it will be easier to create a workable budget, and find ways to save.

Avoid Credit Card Debt

College seniors with credit cards graduate with an average of $4,100 in credit card debt, according to the Nationwide survey. The importance of budgeting is clear when you see the consequences of spending beyond your means. Many students use credit cards to stretch their spending money, but given the high interest rates involved that can be a costly choice.

For example, if you have a $4,100 credit card balance, at an 18% interest rate and you make a $200 payment each month, it will take you 25 months to pay off that balance and it will cost you a whopping $836.27 in interest, money you could have spent on other purchases or put aside in savings. That debt is a big burden to carry, especially since so many graduates also have significant outstanding student loan debts.

Debt can make it more difficult to find or afford your own place or to qualify for an auto or other loan. The best advice: If you’re going to reach for the plastic, make sure it’s a debit card. That way you will spend only what you have in your bank account now and avoid overextending yourself.

Your Local CPA Can Help

College is an exciting time that offers many new experiences, including managing your own money. If you or your family has questions about financial topics, be sure to consult your local CPA. He or she can help you address all your important financial concerns.

Indianapolis Native Serves Aboard USS Forrest Sherman

Story provided by Navy Office of Community Outreach

NORFOLK, Va. – A 2009 Warren Central High School graduate and Indianapolis native is serving aboard USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98), one of the world’s most versatile multi-mission combat ships.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Travis Campbell is a yeoman aboard the Norfolk-based ship, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer that is longer than 1.5 football fields long at nearly 510 feet long. The ship is 66 feet wide and weighs more than 9,200 tons. Twin gas turbine engines can push the ship through the water at more than 30 mph. USS Forrest Sherman is named for Admiral Forrest Percival Sherman, and is the second U.S. Navy ship to bear the name.

As a 24-year-old with numerous responsibilities, Campbell said he is learning about himself as a leader, sailor and a person. Campbell added that his shipboard experience is rewarding and motivating. “When I reported aboard the ship, I was hit with a lot of useful and interesting information, and I try to apply all the knowledge I’ve learned to daily situations,” Campbell said.

He also said he is proud of the work he is doing as part of the Forrest Sherman’s crew, protecting America on the world’s oceans. “I like the daily interaction I get when working with customers aboard the ship,” said Campbell. “It’s knowing when someone has a problem and I am able to fix the situation which makes me feel very important.”

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard USS Forrest Sherman. Approximately 34 officers and 253 enlisted men and women make up the ship’s company, which keeps all parts of the destroyer running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the engines.

“As John Paul Jones said, men mean more than guns in the way you run a ship and it’s still true today. It’s all about our people, I am proud and amazed by the knowledge they display and the work my sailors do every day,” said Cmdr. John A Krisciunas, the ship’s commanding officer. Their professionalism, motivation and commitment to the Navy are genuinely inspiring.”

Fast, maneuverable and technically advanced, destroyers provide the required warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute multi-mission evolutions such as surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare and anti-air warfare. USS Forrest Sherman can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups, amphibious ready groups, and underway replenishment groups.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most versatile combat ships, Campbell and other USS Forrest Sherman sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes.

“Not everyone can do this job,” said Campbell. “Protecting those who can’t defend themselves makes me feel that I am a key asset to the United States Navy.”

“Serving in the Navy is rewarding because it gives me a sense of belonging to something positive,” said Campbell. “No matter what my rank is in the Navy, I will always be a key asset.”